Category Archives: Epilepsy

Treatment Of Childhood Absence Epilepsy

Childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) typically requires treatment because the seizures are frequent and interfere with normal cognitive functioning. International League Against Epilepsy Guidelines (Newly Diagnosed Epilepsy) According to the ILAE guidelines, the absence of class I and class II randomized controlled trials (RCTs) for children with absence seizures implies a marked deficiency in adequately powered,… Read More »

Treatment Of Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy

ILAE Guidelines (Newly Diagnosed Epilepsy) Despite being a relatively common syndrome, there are no randomized trials reporting efficacy or effectiveness as a primary outcome measure in newly diagnosed juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. Valproate has long been regarded as the drug of choice to treat this condition. ‘In the absence of class I, class II and class… Read More »

Treatment Of IGE With GTC Seizures Only

The syndrome of primary generalized-onset tonic–clonic seizures presents the clinician with nosologic, diagnostic and treatment difficulties. Some patients with IGE appear to have generalized-onset tonic–clonic seizures alone and the 1989 ILAE epilepsy classification individualized epilepsy with grand mal seizures on awakening and epilepsies with specific modes of precipitation. The evolving classification of IGE uses more… Read More »

Treatment Of Childhood Absence Epilepsy: American Academy Of Neurology Guidelines

New Anti-Epileptic Drugs Only American Academy of Neurology (AAN) guidelines evaluating efficacy of new anti-epileptic drugs state only that lamotrigine is effective in children with newly diagnosed absence seizures (level B recommendation). Ethosuximide After ethosuximide was described as effective in absence epilepsy in 1958, a number of open-label, non-comparative studies where ethosuximide was added to… Read More »

Treatment Of The Child Or Adolescent With Newly Diagnosed Epilepsy

Paediatric epilepsy is amazingly diverse. In some children, basic diagnosis, seizure classification and treatment are straightforward. Other patients have difficult-to-diagnose seizures, complicated seizure classification and a variable response to treatment. Some seizures are subclinical, others are barely noticeable, and occasionally they are life threatening. Many children with epilepsy have no associated disabilities, but all children… Read More »

Outgrowing Epilepsy in Children

Slightly more than half of the children who have epilepsy outgrow it. This simple and positive fact raises important questions: Which children should be treated? How much medication should they receive? How long should antiepileptic drugs be used? Doctors’ views on antiepileptic drugs have changed. Several decades ago, many doctors believed that seizures must be… Read More »

Epilepsy in Adolescence

The passage from childhood to adulthood is surrounded by issues of rebellion, indepen dence, heightened self-consciousness, experimentation, dating, driving, and concerns for the future. Adolescents and their parents share the highs and lows of this often stormy period, and communication between them is essential to temper its turbulence. This is a challenge for both parents… Read More »

Epilepsy in Childhood

Causes of Epilepsy in Childhood Seizures and epilepsy in children have many causes. Common causes include fever, genetic factors, infections of the brain and its coverings, brain damage due to lack of oxygen or trauma, hydrocephalus (excess water in brain cavities), disorders of brain development, and metabolic disorders. Less common causes of childhood epilepsy include… Read More »

Dietary Therapies for Epilepsy in Children

For centuries, starvation and dehydration were reported to improve seizure control. In addition, substances as diverse as mistletoe, turpentine, and marijuana were claimed to be effective for epilepsy. In 1858, Sir Sieveking wrote, “There is scarcely a substance in the world, capable of passing through the gullet of man, that has not at one time… Read More »