Tag Archives: Carbatrol

Carbamazepine: 100mg, 200mg, 300mg, 400mg. Uses and Administration

Carbamazepine is a dibenzazepine derivative with antiepileptic and psychotropic properties. It is used to control secondarily generalised tonic-clonic seizures and partial seizures, and in some primary generalised seizures. Carbamazepine is also used in the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia and has been tried with variable success in glossopharyngeal neuralgia and other severe pain syndromes associated with… Read More »

Stimulants in the treatment of adults with ADHD

Stimulant treatment of adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder can be characterized as follows. Stimulants represent the first-line pharamcotherapy for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in adults. The two main types of stimulants, methylphenidate and amphetamine compounds, have different effects and are metabolized differently. Methylphenidate does not show up on urine drug screens. Stimulants are not… Read More »

Chronic Illness: Current Therapies

The main goal of bipolar disorder drug treatment is to establish euthymia (stable mood with a persistent sense of well-being) without inducing mania or rapid cycling (i.e., four or more mood episodes in a 12-month period). For this reason, drug treatment usually consists of an agent or, more frequently, combinations of agents that exert both… Read More »

Chronic Illness: Emerging Therapies

Few new drugs are in clinical development for the treatment of Bipolar disorder. Most agents in clinical trials for this disorder (e.g., Bristol-Myers Squibb’s aripiprazole, Novartis’s oxcarbazepine, AstraZeneca’s quetiapine, Janssen’s risperidone, Ortho-McNeil’s topiramate, Pfizer’s ziprasidone) are already available in the major markets (United States, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, United Kingdom, and Japan) for the treatment… Read More »

Treatment Of The Child Or Adolescent With Newly Diagnosed Epilepsy

Paediatric epilepsy is amazingly diverse. In some children, basic diagnosis, seizure classification and treatment are straightforward. Other patients have difficult-to-diagnose seizures, complicated seizure classification and a variable response to treatment. Some seizures are subclinical, others are barely noticeable, and occasionally they are life threatening. Many children with epilepsy have no associated disabilities, but all children… Read More »

AEDs: Use Of Serum Levels

Physicians may be confused about whether measurement of serum concentrations is important for epilepsy patients, particularly for the new anti-epileptic drugs. Most experts believe that it is more important to individualize dosing, and to understand the serum concentration that is optimal on an individual basis. This may mean that some individuals have optimal control and… Read More »

Antiepileptic Drugs

Antiepileptic drugs are a class of medications developed to treat people with seizures. Tremendous effort and resources have been dedicated to epilepsy research. In the last years new antiepileptic drugs have become available for use. Even more surprisingly, these drugs have been found to improve the lives of people with a variety of medical disorders… Read More »

Anticonvulsant Drugs

Pharmacologic Profile General Use Anticonvulsants are used to decrease the incidence and severity of seizures due various etiologies. Some anticonvulsants are used parenterally in the immediate treatment of seizures. It is not uncommon for patients to require more than one anticonvulsant to control seizures on a long-term basis. Many regimens are evaluated with serum level… Read More »

Drugs Commonly Used Against Epilepsy

The following pages discuss the most commonly used antiepileptic drugs, listed alphabetically. A discussion of the role of benzodiazepines (clonazepam, clobazam, clorazepate, diazepam, lorazepam) follows. Acetazolamide Acetazolamide (Diamox ®) can be used with another drug to treat absence and myoclonic seizures. It is also used to treat partial or generalized seizures that occur more often… Read More »

Time Required for Antiepileptic Drugs to Work

Absorption Oral medication passes through the stomach and is absorbed in the small intestine. It may then go to the liver, where many drugs are metabolized or broken down, and then enters into the bloodstream. Eventually, antiepileptic drugs reach the brain. Some drugs are mainly eliminated by the kidneys in an unchanged (not metabolized) form.… Read More »