Tag Archives: Droperidol

Dissociative [Conversion] Disorders

Description of Medical Condition A sudden change in state of consciousness, identity, motor behavior, thoughts, feelings and perception of external reality to such an extent that these functions do not operate congruently. Many pathologic symptoms can be found, but the patient experiences dysphoria, suffering, and maladaptive functioning. Disorders include: • Dissociative amnesia • Dissociative fugue… Read More »

Delirium: Pharmacological Treatment

Current delirium pharmacotherapies have evolved from use in the treatment of mainstream psychiatric disorders; hence, psychiatrists are well acquainted with the practicalities of their use. Medications are implicated as significant contributing factors in more than one-third of cases and can act as either protective or risk factors for delirium, depending on the drug. Pharmacological treatment… Read More »

Antipsychotics For The Treatment Of Schizophrenia

Following the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) classification system by WHO Collaborating Centre for Drug Statistics Methodology), antipsychotics (ATC N05A) are classified as: • N05AA Phenothiazines with aliphatic side-chain: Chlorpromazine, Levomepromazine, Promazine, Triflupromazine, Cyamemazine, Chlorproethazine • N05AB Phenothiazines with piperazine structure: Dixyrazine, Fluphenazine, Perphenazine, Prochlorperazine, Thiopropazate, Trifluoperazine, Acetophenazine, Thioproperazine, Butaperazine, Perazine • N05AC Phenothiazines with piperidine… Read More »

Typical Antipsychotics For The Treatment Of Schizophrenia

Lithium • Lithium and lithium salts (especially carbonate or citrate) were the focus of research in depression topic in the 1930’s. Lithium carbonate was launched in 1939 by Solvay for the treatment of depression and schizophrenia, and in 2002 Glaxo launched it for the treatment of mania • For many years, the effect of lithium… Read More »

Atypical Antipsychotics

Atypical Antipsychotics: Side Effects A number of typical and atypical antipsychotics increase the QTc interval and augment the risk for torsade de pointes (torsades des pointes) and ventricular arrhythmias. Cardiovascular Risk QT relates to the time lapse from the beginning of the QRS until the end of the T-wave; this corresponds to the ventricular systole.… Read More »