Tag Archives: Lithium

Depression and Suicide

Suicidal behavior is one of the most serious outcomes of psychiatric illness and is particularly associated with major depression. Standardized tools for classifying mental disorders () list suicidal cognitions as one of the key symptoms of depression. They can range in severity from “recurrent thoughts of death” or “thinking that you would be better off… Read More »

Carbamazepine: 100mg, 200mg, 300mg, 400mg. Uses and Administration

Carbamazepine is a dibenzazepine derivative with antiepileptic and psychotropic properties. It is used to control secondarily generalised tonic-clonic seizures and partial seizures, and in some primary generalised seizures. Carbamazepine is also used in the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia and has been tried with variable success in glossopharyngeal neuralgia and other severe pain syndromes associated with… Read More »

Management of Bipolar Disorder

Antipsychotics are frequently used in the treatment of bipolar disorder. Most patients started on antipsychotics as adjunctive treatment for manic episodes continue these agents beyond 6 months, even in the absence of conclusive data on the long-term efficacy of most antipsychotics in maintenance treatment. Typical antipsychotics are effective antimanic agents but appear less effective than… Read More »

Bipolar Depression

The notion that bipolar and unipolar depression might be distinct illnesses was first proposed in the middle of the 20th century. Before this time, manic-depressive illness was considered to encompass a broad range of psychopathology, including recurrent unipolar depression. We now recognize that there are substantial differences between depression arising from bipolar disorder and with… Read More »

Bipolar Depression: Treatment Acute Pharmacotherapy

Lithium For many years, lithium was considered to be the standard treatment for bipolar depression. Improvement rates of 80% have been reported in nine placebo-controlled studies, conducted mostly in the 1970s. Response rates for lithium were equivalent to those for tricyclic antidepressants (tricyclic antidepressants). A recent study of outpatients with bipolar depression compared the efficacy… Read More »

Bipolar Depression: Antidepressants

Tricyclic Antidepressants Literature is sparse on controlled studies of tricyclic antidepressants for bipolar depression. Tricyclic antidepressants are more effective in the treatment of unipolar depression than in bipolar depression. The risk of switching patients from bipolar depression to mania and of shortening cycle lengths makes tricyclic antidepressants unattractive choices for the treatment of bipolar depression.… Read More »

What kind of medication reactions could be serious or lethal?

Concerning the medications used in the treatment of anxiety, there are several absolute red flags that any patient on those medications must know about. Please keep the following in mind: Overdose. If taken in excess — either accidental or intentional — any medication can create serious problems. In particular, however, benzodiazepines, lithium, and tricyclic antidepressants… Read More »

Treatment of Anxiety in the Medically Ill

Psychotherapy An overemphasis on psychopharmacology in the care of medically ill patients may result in overlooking the value of psychotherapy. The first step in the treatment of anxiety is to spend time listening to and talking with the patient. Just as in psychotherapy with any patient, empathic listening is a powerful tool to relieve distress.… Read More »

Compliance with Medications

Question. As a school psychologist, I see a large number of students who take psychotropic medications haphazardly. I’m curious about research on the impact of taking antidepressants or antipsychotic medications “when remembered,” either in general or specific to the medication. I believe that poor compliance with the medication schedule actually causes a worsening of some… Read More »

Caffeine and Psychotropics

Question. Are there any psychotropics that have a negative interaction with caffeine? Is caffeine bad for people with certain disorders? Answer. There are certainly psychotropics that can interact with caffeine in clinically important ways, though not always in bad ways. First, though, it’s important to distinguish two types of drug-drug interactions. In one type of… Read More »