Tag Archives: Moban

Current Therapies for Insomnia

Most individuals who suffer from insomnia either self-treat with nonprescription sleep aids (e.g., antihistamines, herbal remedies), use alcohol as a sedative, or take no drug therapy at all. For those who do seek professional help (approximately one-third of insomniacs), the majority receive physician-prescribed benzodiazepine or non-benzodiazepine sedative hypnotics to treat their insomnia. Such hypnotic agents… Read More »

Nonbenzodiazepine Hypnotics

Non-benzodiazepine hypnotics were introduced in most markets in the early 1990s. To date, three non-benzodiazepine hypnotics have been launched for insomnia — zolpidem, zopiclone, and zaleplon (Wyeth and King Pharmaceuticals’ Sonata). Characteristics that distinguish these drugs from traditional benzodiazepines (discussed later) are their increased receptor-binding specificity, favorable pharmacokinetics, and overall broader range of safety. More… Read More »

Emerging Therapies for Insomnia

Most of the late-stage compounds in clinical development for insomnia are non-benzodiazepine gamma-aminobutyric acid -acting agents. These drugs’ developers are hoping that their new compounds, once approved, will achieve less restrictive labeling from regulatory authorities than the currently marketed benzodiazepine and non-benzodiazepine hypnotics — most of which have short-term prescribing limits and all of which… Read More »

Nonbenzodiazepine GABA-A Agonists

As mentioned, non-benzodiazepine gamma aminobutyric acid-A agonists in clinical development are very similar in terms of mechanism of action, safety, and efficacy to the currently marketed non-benzodiazepine hypnotics zolpidem, zopiclone, and zaleplon (which are sometimes referred to as the “Z” drugs). Consequently, none of these clinical-stage compounds is likely to offer major benefits in terms… Read More »

Pharmacotherapy in the Treatment of People With Schizophrenia

The pharmacological agents most primarily associated with treatment of schizophrenia are grouped in a large and heterogeneous family, the antipsychotics. Recently, this family has been subdivided into the typicals, or neuroleptics, and the atypicals (see Tables Selected Typical Antipsychotic Drugs and Their Characteristics and Atypical Antipsychotics: Relative Potencies and Side Effects). The neuroleptics are so… Read More »

Drugs in Treatment of Schizophrenia

  The introduction of chlorpromazine (Thorazine), the first of the antipsychotic drugs (also known as neuroleptics), in 1952 revolutionized the treatment of schizophrenia. Since then, these drugs have become the mainstay of treatment for people with schizophrenia. Before these drugs were discovered, many who suffered from this illness spent most of their lives in hospitals,… Read More »