Tag Archives: Molindone

Pharmacotherapy in the Treatment of People With Schizophrenia

The pharmacological agents most primarily associated with treatment of schizophrenia are grouped in a large and heterogeneous family, the antipsychotics. Recently, this family has been subdivided into the typicals, or neuroleptics, and the atypicals (see Tables Selected Typical Antipsychotic Drugs and Their Characteristics and Atypical Antipsychotics: Relative Potencies and Side Effects). The neuroleptics are so… Read More »

Adjunctive Pharmacotherapy and Related Issues

Managing antipsychotic side effects. Antipsychotic drugs produce problematic side effects in many individuals (see Table Side Effects of Typical Antipsychotic Drugs). A major category of side effects results from neurotransmitter dysregulation of the extra-pyramidal motor system. It is thought that these side effects are the result of an imbalance of dopaminergic and acetylcholinergic activity in… Read More »

Pharmacological treatment for schizophrenia

Pharmacological treatments are an essential component of a comprehensive approach to the treatment of schizophrenia. Rational pharmacotherapies can contribute greatly to symptom relief and to a broader psychosocial recovery for affected individuals. However, antipsychotic drugs do not cure schizophrenia. Moreover, if not used judiciously, drug therapies can create significant financial, side-effect, and medical morbidity burdens… Read More »

Treatment for Schizophrenia: Antipsychotic Drugs

Modern drug treatment for schizophrenia dates to the early 1950s, when Deniker and Delay reported the antipsychotic effects of chlorpromazine (). Chlorpromazine was introduced in the United States in 1954, followed over the next three decades by several drugs, including fluphenazine, haloperidol, perphenazine, and thioridazine, with similar therapeutic effects. All of these so-called first-generation antipsychotics… Read More »

Common Side Effects: Monitoring and Management Recommendations

Extrapyramidal Side Effects Antipsychotic-induced EPS may occur acutely or after long-term treatment. First-generation antipsychotics, in particular high-potency neuroleptics, are more likely than second-generation antipsychotics to cause EPS when the drugs are used at usual therapeutic doses. However, as can be noted in Table Selected side effects of commonly used antipsychotic medications, considerable variation in the… Read More »

Antipsychotics For The Treatment Of Schizophrenia

Following the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) classification system by WHO Collaborating Centre for Drug Statistics Methodology), antipsychotics (ATC N05A) are classified as: • N05AA Phenothiazines with aliphatic side-chain: Chlorpromazine, Levomepromazine, Promazine, Triflupromazine, Cyamemazine, Chlorproethazine • N05AB Phenothiazines with piperazine structure: Dixyrazine, Fluphenazine, Perphenazine, Prochlorperazine, Thiopropazate, Trifluoperazine, Acetophenazine, Thioproperazine, Butaperazine, Perazine • N05AC Phenothiazines with piperidine… Read More »

Drugs in Treatment of Schizophrenia

  The introduction of chlorpromazine (Thorazine), the first of the antipsychotic drugs (also known as neuroleptics), in 1952 revolutionized the treatment of schizophrenia. Since then, these drugs have become the mainstay of treatment for people with schizophrenia. Before these drugs were discovered, many who suffered from this illness spent most of their lives in hospitals,… Read More »