Tag Archives: Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors

Pharmacological Treatment of Dementia

General guidelines for psychotropic medication use in frail elderly patients are applicable. Systematic evidence to support the effectiveness of particular psychotropic drugs in dementia patients is limited. Therefore, choice of drug class may be based on clinical evidence, and choice of agent is often based on the side-effect profile and on the characteristics of a… Read More »

Alzheimer’s Therapy: Antidepressants

Overview. Major depression affects approximately 15% of Alzheimer’s disease patients. By comparison, 5-12% of the general population aged 15 years or older in the major pharmaceutical markets experience at least one episode of major depression per year. Because depression itself may lead to declines in cognition and function, treatment of depression in Alzheimer’s disease patients… Read More »

Pharmacotherapy of Adult ADHD

Originally conceptualized as a disorder of childhood (), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is increasingly recognized in adults. attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is estimated to affect 2-9% of school-age children and up to 5% of adults (). Although some investigators question the persistence of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in adulthood (), long-term controlled follow-up studies… Read More »

Nonstimulant medications in the treatment of adults with ADHD

Here are some important points regarding nonstimulants in the treatment of adults with ADHD. Tricyclic antidepressants and bupropion are second-line therapies. Antidepressant dosing of the agents appears necessary for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder efficacy. Serotonergic medications do not appear effective in the treatment of core attention deficit hyperactivity disorder symptoms but may be useful for… Read More »

Bipolar Depression: Antidepressants

Tricyclic Antidepressants Literature is sparse on controlled studies of tricyclic antidepressants for bipolar depression. Tricyclic antidepressants are more effective in the treatment of unipolar depression than in bipolar depression. The risk of switching patients from bipolar depression to mania and of shortening cycle lengths makes tricyclic antidepressants unattractive choices for the treatment of bipolar depression.… Read More »

Treatment of Anxiety in the Medically Ill

Psychotherapy An overemphasis on psychopharmacology in the care of medically ill patients may result in overlooking the value of psychotherapy. The first step in the treatment of anxiety is to spend time listening to and talking with the patient. Just as in psychotherapy with any patient, empathic listening is a powerful tool to relieve distress.… Read More »

Information about Anxiety Disorders for Patients and Families

Anxiety disorders are a group of disorders that have different causes but share many symptoms. Anxiety disorders are the most common of the psychiatric illnesses. The core symptoms of anxiety disorders are nervousness, worry, and fear. The patient’s symptoms may cause distress and result in some functional impairment. In the spectrum of anxiety disorders, anxieties… Read More »

Pharmacological Treatment of Pain

While medications are often prescribed for all types of chronic pain, research has consistently shown that several classes have proven efficacy for the treatment of neuropathic pain. Ideally, pharmacotherapy of pain would be specifically selected on the basis of considerations of etiology (e.g., ischemic, neuropathic), pathophysiology (e.g., demyelination, central pain), and anatomy (e.g., C fibers,… Read More »

Minor Depression

Etiology and Pathophysiology Minor depression is only a proposed diagnosis in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, and there are no International Classification of Diseases codes to categorize it. The proposed diagnostic category for minor depression in Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition describes a depressive disorder that… Read More »

Minor Depression: Tricyclic Antidepressant

Tricyclic antidepressants entered the market in the 1960s after the Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors but quickly lost their popularity when the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors entered the market. Although tricyclic antidepressants are as effective as the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and serotonin/norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors in treating most forms of depression, they have the potential for cardiotoxicity… Read More »