Tag Archives: Remeron

Alzheimer’s Therapy: Antidepressants

Overview. Major depression affects approximately 15% of Alzheimer’s disease patients. By comparison, 5-12% of the general population aged 15 years or older in the major pharmaceutical markets experience at least one episode of major depression per year. Because depression itself may lead to declines in cognition and function, treatment of depression in Alzheimer’s disease patients… Read More »

Current Therapies for Insomnia

Most individuals who suffer from insomnia either self-treat with nonprescription sleep aids (e.g., antihistamines, herbal remedies), use alcohol as a sedative, or take no drug therapy at all. For those who do seek professional help (approximately one-third of insomniacs), the majority receive physician-prescribed benzodiazepine or non-benzodiazepine sedative hypnotics to treat their insomnia. Such hypnotic agents… Read More »

Sedating Antidepressants

Given the high comorbidity of insomnia and depression and / or anxiety, sedating antidepressants have considerable relevance for treating insomnia. (Note: Sedating antidepressants can effectively treat both depressive and anxious symptoms.) The sleep-promoting properties of the sedating antidepressants, as well as their lack of abuse potential or propensity to induce tolerance, make these agents viable… Read More »

Emerging Therapies for Insomnia

Most of the late-stage compounds in clinical development for insomnia are non-benzodiazepine gamma-aminobutyric acid -acting agents. These drugs’ developers are hoping that their new compounds, once approved, will achieve less restrictive labeling from regulatory authorities than the currently marketed benzodiazepine and non-benzodiazepine hypnotics — most of which have short-term prescribing limits and all of which… Read More »

Minor Depression: Duloxetine, Venlafaxine, and Milnacipran

Serotonin-Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitors Several antidepressants have dual action at both serotonergic and noradrenergic receptors. The most notable are the serotonin/norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, particularly extended-release venlafaxine (Wyeth’s Effexor XR) and milnacipran (bioMerieux-Pierre Fabre’s Ixel/Dalcipran, Asahi Kasei/Janssen-Kyowa’s Toledomin; available only in France and Japan). The noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressants (NaSSAs) mirtazapine (Organon’s Remeron/Remergil), nefazodone (Bristol-Myers Squibb’s… Read More »

Minor Depression: Escitalopram, Paroxetine, Sertraline, and Fluoxetine

Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors The seven available agents in the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor class are citalopram (Lund-beck’s Cipramil, Forest Laboratories’ Celexa, generics) and its single enan-tiomer, escitalopram (Lundbeck’s Cipralex, Forest’s Lexapro); paroxetine (GSK’s Paxil/Seroxat, Novartis’s Frosinor, generics); the controlled-release version of paroxetine (GSK’s Paxil CR); sertraline (Pfizer’s Zoloft); fluoxetine (Eli Lilly’s Prozac, generics); and… Read More »

Chronic Illness: Current Therapies

The main goal of bipolar disorder drug treatment is to establish euthymia (stable mood with a persistent sense of well-being) without inducing mania or rapid cycling (i.e., four or more mood episodes in a 12-month period). For this reason, drug treatment usually consists of an agent or, more frequently, combinations of agents that exert both… Read More »

Mood disorders: Intervention

As has been indicated, assessment of a primary mood disorder, especially depression, is difficult and involves exploration of many factors, since the mood disorder may be masked by physical problems and other mental disorders. Social workers are trained to look at all of the factors that are impinging on the individual, but they must be… Read More »

The creators of the myth

The evidence presented in this book demonstrates the eagerness of the psychiatric profession to embrace the myth of disease-specific treatments. This is understandable, given the profession’s long-standing battle to align itself squarely as a branch of the medical profession. Thus psychiatric disorders have generally been conceptualised as biological conditions and physical interventions have been at… Read More »

The ideology of psychopharmacology

The data surveyed in this book suggest that psychiatric drug treatment is currently administered on the basis of a huge collective myth; the myth that psychiatric drugs act by correcting the biological basis of psychiatric symptoms or diseases. We have seen that for the three main classes of drugs used in psychiatry there is no… Read More »