Tag Archives: Tricyclic Antidepressants

Depression and Suicide

Suicidal behavior is one of the most serious outcomes of psychiatric illness and is particularly associated with major depression. Standardized tools for classifying mental disorders () list suicidal cognitions as one of the key symptoms of depression. They can range in severity from “recurrent thoughts of death” or “thinking that you would be better off… Read More »

Lamotrigine: 25mg, 50mg, 100mg, 150mg, 200mg, 250mg. Uses and Administration

Lamotrigine, a phenyltriazine compound, is an antiepileptic used mainly for monotherapy or adjunctive treatment of partial seizures and primary and secondarily generalised tonic-clonic seizures. It may be used for seizures associated with the Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and for the maintenance treatment of bipolar disorder. The doses given below for the use of lamotrigine in epilepsy are… Read More »

Alzheimer’s Therapy: Antidepressants

Overview. Major depression affects approximately 15% of Alzheimer’s disease patients. By comparison, 5-12% of the general population aged 15 years or older in the major pharmaceutical markets experience at least one episode of major depression per year. Because depression itself may lead to declines in cognition and function, treatment of depression in Alzheimer’s disease patients… Read More »

Pharmacotherapy of Adult ADHD

Originally conceptualized as a disorder of childhood (), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is increasingly recognized in adults. attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is estimated to affect 2-9% of school-age children and up to 5% of adults (). Although some investigators question the persistence of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in adulthood (), long-term controlled follow-up studies… Read More »

Nonstimulant medications in the treatment of adults with ADHD

Here are some important points regarding nonstimulants in the treatment of adults with ADHD. Tricyclic antidepressants and bupropion are second-line therapies. Antidepressant dosing of the agents appears necessary for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder efficacy. Serotonergic medications do not appear effective in the treatment of core attention deficit hyperactivity disorder symptoms but may be useful for… Read More »

Bipolar Depression

The notion that bipolar and unipolar depression might be distinct illnesses was first proposed in the middle of the 20th century. Before this time, manic-depressive illness was considered to encompass a broad range of psychopathology, including recurrent unipolar depression. We now recognize that there are substantial differences between depression arising from bipolar disorder and with… Read More »

Bipolar Depression: Treatment Acute Pharmacotherapy

Lithium For many years, lithium was considered to be the standard treatment for bipolar depression. Improvement rates of 80% have been reported in nine placebo-controlled studies, conducted mostly in the 1970s. Response rates for lithium were equivalent to those for tricyclic antidepressants (tricyclic antidepressants). A recent study of outpatients with bipolar depression compared the efficacy… Read More »

Bipolar Depression: Antidepressants

Tricyclic Antidepressants Literature is sparse on controlled studies of tricyclic antidepressants for bipolar depression. Tricyclic antidepressants are more effective in the treatment of unipolar depression than in bipolar depression. The risk of switching patients from bipolar depression to mania and of shortening cycle lengths makes tricyclic antidepressants unattractive choices for the treatment of bipolar depression.… Read More »

Current Therapies for Insomnia

Most individuals who suffer from insomnia either self-treat with nonprescription sleep aids (e.g., antihistamines, herbal remedies), use alcohol as a sedative, or take no drug therapy at all. For those who do seek professional help (approximately one-third of insomniacs), the majority receive physician-prescribed benzodiazepine or non-benzodiazepine sedative hypnotics to treat their insomnia. Such hypnotic agents… Read More »

Sedating Antidepressants

Given the high comorbidity of insomnia and depression and / or anxiety, sedating antidepressants have considerable relevance for treating insomnia. (Note: Sedating antidepressants can effectively treat both depressive and anxious symptoms.) The sleep-promoting properties of the sedating antidepressants, as well as their lack of abuse potential or propensity to induce tolerance, make these agents viable… Read More »